Traditionally coming from advertising and internationally known
for his interpretation of Pop-Art into the 21st century,
he masters the balancing act towards abstract art works
characterized by an inspiring alternating tension.
There he goes into the visionary, diffuse with his paintings -
knowing that only the willingness to work
in the unknown enables artistic utopia and freedom.
An artist on the throw-off
Museo Ferrari Maranello, Italy VfB Stuttgart PopArt-Series 125 Years i8 ArtCar „iGlacier” Catherine Palace St. Petersburg, Russia First European Artist Biggest German 2 wheel- and NSU Museum Legends of Le Mans Museum Volkswagen Wolfsburg, Germany National States Museum of Kazakhstan Meet the Artist Traditionally coming from advertising and internationally known for his interpretation of Pop-Art into the 21st century, he masters the balancing act towards abstract art works There he goes into the visionary, diffuse with his paintings - knowing that only the willingness to work characterized by an inspiring alternating tension. in the unknown enables artistic utopia and freedom. An artist on the throw-off.

AUTOMOTIVE MEDIAMIX

The 40's

Motorsport in Europe came to a complete halt during the Second World War. A new start in autumn 1945 saw smaller racing events in the Bois de Boulogne in Paris. Numerous racing drivers had lost their lives during the war, and the young drivers of the new era were devoid of any racing experience. As a result, the frequently 40 or 50-year-old experienced “Heroes of the Pre-War Years” very often dominated postwar racing: Rudolf Caracciola, Hans Stuck, Hermann Lang and Tazio Nuvolari.

 

Following the Second World War, the sport would have to progress for some time at pre-war levels, and even the cars were of the pre-war era. Factories were in no position to produce new vehicles. For example, the basic concept behind the Alfa Romeo could be traced back to 1937. New life was breathed into the racing courses: the Mille Miglia in 1947, the Targa Florio in 1948, the Solitude and Le Mans in 1949 and AVUS in 1951.

 

Following the decision to organising the Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix for motorcycles in 1949, the automobile sport was not far behind and held the first World Championship in 1950 which would later become the Formula One World Championship.